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www.MoreThanMeat.co.uk – Goes live!

After what seems like a whirlwind few weeks, my new Web site www.morethanmeat.co.uk is now live.

 

Please go and take a look and let me know what you think.  For the time being you cannot order directly on-line as we want to try out a number of temperature controlled packaging options as well as a number of couriers.  If you do want some products and you are in the UK – let me know and we will see what we can do to accommodate your request.

 

Also – if you are local to Tunbridge Wells then come on down to the Pantiles Farmers Market where you can try the product and buy them to consume onsite or enjoy at home.

 

We are selling our More Than Beef Burgers as well as the More Than Lamb casserole.  In addition there are a number of new products in the planning stages, including a square sausage – well we like to be different and sausage rolls – so watch this space, or look out for them on www.morethanmeat.co.uk

 

Apologies for all my followers here that I have not been able to keep up the blogs and recipes, but as you may imagine the work on getting More Than Meat to market has been all consuming in addition to still working for Nomis 3 days per week.

 

Thanks for your continued support.

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More Than Meat Products ->>NOW AVAILABLE!!!

I am proud to announce that the first two of my food products are now available.

Why did I create my food range?

After years of yo-yo dieting, I switched to a whole food, plant-based diet and it changed my life and health. I founded my company, Plantalicious Ltd, to help others make the same change for their own good and also for the good of the planet – without feeling like their tastebuds are losing out. Our healthy revolutionary More Than Meat products are all home-made in small batches, straight from our kitchen to yours. They are high-protein, zero cholesterol meals, containing no added fats, no eggs, no dairy and, of course, no meat. We make them taste so delicious by incorporating purely natural seasoning in a unique way. If you follow a More Than Meat lifestyle, it doesn’t have to be all or nothing. But I hope that our product range helps make it as easy as possible to reduce your meat intake for a healthier future.

 

What are the products?

Currently we offer 2 products, a More Than Beef Burger and a More Than Lamb Casserole with white beans, rosemary mint in a rich red wine and tomato gravy.  Many more products are on their way!

 

What’s so good about them?  

Here is an comparison between the More Than Beef Burger and a Waitrose Organic Burger:MTM contains 37% less calories

  • MTM contains 38% more protein
  • MTM contains 99% less saturated fat
  • MTM contains 13.5 times more fibre
  • MTM contains 72% less sodium
  • MTM contains zero cholestorol
  • (salt data not available from product information)
    *100g Nutritional comparison with Waitrose Organic Beef Burger calculated 13.02.15

Can I see what the products look like?  

Here are pictures of the products:

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Who are the products suitable for?

My products are suitable for vegans, vegetarians, meat reducers and meat eaters.  They contain the following allergens: Wheat Gluten, Celery, Soy and are NOT SUITABLE for Coeliacs or other gluten allergies/intolerances.  They are also made in a kitchen that handles nuts.

 

Yum – I want to buy some – Where can I get them from?

We are working hard to secure a market stall in London, and will let you know as soon as we have this sorted.  If you’d like to buy the products you can order them by emailing Barry@Plantalicious.com or calling 07785280534 for collection from Sydenham or for local delivery for orders over £20.  Mail order is possible but again subject to min order levels – please contact me for details.

 

How much do they cost?

More Than Beef Burgers        (Pack of 2)                                £2.95 rrp     £2.65

More Than Lamb Casserole  (2x 290g portions)                  £7.00 rrp     £6.50

 

Questions?

Get in touch – Barry@Plantalicious.com or +44(0)7785280534

 

I hope you will try my products and that you will love them.  If you do, please tell lots of others, if you don’t love them, then please tell me.

 

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What fruit or vegetable do you dislike?

Is there a fruit or vegetable that you dislike?

What is it about that particular fruit or vegetable that you dislike?

Do you only like some things cooked or raw?

As a child I had a hatred of a number of foods, these included peas – I hated the texture; broad beans – the smell put me off; Brussels Sprouts – I would sit for hours doing battle with my parents finally agreeing to eat two before I could leave the table!

Nowadays there are few things that I do not like.  One of these is the humble Pear.

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Guess what?  Pears are in season just now and having not checked what was in my organic box this week, I got not one but four lots of pears.  Enough for a family of 6 or a small office.  The problem is that our family is just me and Mr G and i’m not lugging pears into my office in town.

The other thing that I get from my childhood is the belief that food should not be wasted.  Many of the meals that I ate as a child were made from leftovers.  The Sunday roast would provide a meal for the family as a roast, then maybe a casserole and maybe a soup or cold cuts.  Vegetables were turned into pies, or bubble and squeak.   So I was not prepared to waste them.  Mr G only likes pears when they are rock hard and these were ripe when delivered.  Hmmm.  What to do?

I came up with two recipes that worked for me.  I like pears in salads, so I made a salad –Pear & Pecan Salad Recipe I also love crumbles and anything ginger so I made a Pear and Ginger Crumble – Pear and Ginger Crumble Recipe

I have to say that based on that experience, I am not dreading more pears but actually quite looking forward to making another crumble or salad!

So, despite my strong dislike of pears, I managed to make two Plantalicious dishes both of which I liked and judging by the empty dishes, so did Mr G.

What vegetables and fruits do you dislike?  Leave me a message on here or on the community pages of the things that you dislike and why and if you want me to see if I can conjure up a recipe that you would like so you can rediscover your nemesis, just as I did.

 

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The A-Z of Plantalicious Ingredients – L Is for Lemon

The sour taste of lemons causes this fruit to get the reputation of being acidic. The truth is that, in the body at least, lemons are alkaline and can do a lot to help balance out an acidic body. So while the juice can work well as a cleaner in its acidic state outside of the body, inside it counter acts sugars (which actually create an acidic body state) and can even help to ward off certain types of cancer.

Whether your goal is to lose weight or to detox your system, lemons can be of assistance. They are great for everything from your brain to your bowel. Plus, lemons are versatile and work as a garnish, a dressing, a drink, a dessert, and more! What other health benefits make lemons an indispensable part of a plant based diet?

Some of the many health benefits derived from lemons include:

  • Lemons are great as part of a cleanse. They help the liver to get rid of solvents. Just a little bit of lemon water each morning can help break down uric acid and other toxins in the body.

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  • Do you have a problem with kidney stones, gall stones, or other calcium buildup issues? Lemons break down calcium and can help to keep calcium deposits from forming within the body.
  • Lemons also can destroy many bacterial diseases such as typhoid and malaria. It’s one of the reasons that lemon is used in cleaning products (not just the lovely scent). It performs the same job in the body, helping the immune system to ward off deadly intruders.
  • We all know that carrots are good for vision, but lemons have positive eye effects too. Rutin is the lemon component that can improve eye disorders like diabetic retinopathy.
  • Lemons are full of antioxidants which fight free radicals in the body. In fact, there are 22 different cancer fighting agents found within lemons.
  • The digestive system gets help from lemons as well. Lemons can help to ward off constipation, thus keeping the colon cleaned out. Also, lemons are known for being able to kill certain intestinal parasites.
  • The vitamin C in lemons is not only an antioxidant and a liver cleanser, but it also helps to speed up metabolism. High vitamin C content is what makes lemons useful for weight loss diets.
  • Another little known fact is that lemons are high in potassium. This is a vital mineral for heart health. It helps keep the blood pressure lower by reducing stress. Potassium is also important in counteracting dehydration.

Are you a lemon fan?  What is your favourite way of consuming these wonderful little yellow nutritional powerhouses?

Note of caution – unless lemons are marked as “unwaxed” always wash them in warm water to remove the wax, as you would with any citrus fruit.

Tips:

  • To get the most juice out of them, pop in a microwave for 30-60 secs and then gently roll them on a chopping board or counter top.  Then pierce in the centre and gently squeeze to get some of the juice out, before cutting in half and juicing.
  • Add a few drops of lemon juice to soups etc it helps you cut down on salt
  • Fresh Lemon and Mint with ice is a wonderful refreshing and hydrating drink when its hot
  • Start your day with a glass of warm water and lemon juice to kick-start your body

 

 

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The A-Z of Plantalicious Ingredients – K Is for Kale

If you’ve spent any amount of time on a plant based diet or juicing, then you know that kale is a staple for providing the nutritional benefits to have energy on a day to day basis. Kale has all sorts of nicknames that hail it as everything from a vegetarian or vegan’s meat to the nutritional powerhouse of greens.
Whether you are trying to detox or lose weight, kale has what you need. It’s a great immune system booster. Making kale a regular part of your diet can even improve the condition of your skin, nails, and hair. What are the secrets that kale holds which make it the perfect plant for everything from fighting off disease to improving your vision?
Just some of the many benefits of kale include:
• An aid to digestion, kale contains 5 g of dietary fiber per serving. With no fat and only 36 calories per cup, kale is gentle on the digestive tract and will help keep a person regular.
• The letter K stands for kale on our A-Z list, and kale also stands for K, vitamin K that is. Whether you are concerned about clotting properly, fighting off the effects of Alzheimer’s, or want to protect yourself from certain forms of cancer, vitamin K has to be in your nutritional alphabet. Kale is a great source.
• Vitamin A also abounds in kale, giving a huge boost to your eyes, and helping to prevent optical disorders.
• Kale also contains both vitamin D and calcium. It’s a 1-2 punch for healthy teeth and bones, since the vitamin D improves calcium absorption. Plus, vitamin C provides additional benefits for the cartilage and joints.
• Kale gets the nickname beef, but that’s really not fair to the kale. Kale actually has more iron than red meat. Iron helps to fend off anemia, and it also plays a vital role in helping oxygen to get to all parts of the body.
• Omega-3 fatty acids make kale a great food for fighting inflammation. Omega-3 and omega-6 are also vital for the skin, making it appear vibrant by healing from the inside out. Hair and nails also need these fatty acids to thrive.
• Any sort of detox should include kale in some form. It contains both fiber and sulfur. It’s great for the liver and for the colon, detoxing the whole body instead of just one system.

Quick recipe tips, if you have some Kale in the fridge and happen to have made some hummus in your blender, scrape it out, but leave some residue. add some water, lemon juice or vinegar, (apple cider is my preference) and some garlic, salt and pepper, and whizz and you have a delicious creamy dressing for your kale salad).
Pop a few Kale leaves in your smoothie to “beef” it up a bit.

Love it or hate it? Share your thoughts and favourite Kale recipes in the community pages.

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Book Review – Rethink Food, by Shushana Castle and Amy-Lee Goodman

So many people trivialise diet and the link between what we eat and our health.  Friends, colleagues, personal trainers, that chap down the pub even Dr’s and specialists deny that there is a link between our well-being and what we stuff down our throats every day to feed ourselves.

 

Well, now there is a book that helps you fight back with the assistance of over 100 Doctors – real qualified Dr’s not quacks or people with an axe to grind, plus a bunch of elite althletes and 8 world renowned nutritionists. This small global army provide evidence based arguements for how a plant-based diet can not only prevent but reverse a range of chronic diseases.

 

The book uses a format whereby each one of contributors provides an article or small chapter on their personal perspective.  Some reviewers do not like this format as it does lead to some repetition, but in my opinion, they are missing the point as the repetition is there to drive home the message of the book that a plant-based way of eating not only deals with the symptoms of many chronic diseases but actually the causes.  This is something that traditional medicine fails to do every day for many millions of people while the pharmaceutical industry’s profits grow in proportion to the obesity epidemic that we are seeing in so many developed countries around the world.

 

The material in this book debunks many of the myths around nutrition and health as well as the down right lies and falsehoods that have been propagated by the meat and dairy industry over the years.  Think about – “Milk for strong bones” or should that be “Milk for osteoporosis”; “Meat the ultimate and only protein source” or should that be “we need much less protein and can get all we need from a plant-based diet”.

 

Critics will say that the book does not provide any counter arguements to it’s viewpoint.  Again, I think that is the point of this book.  There is so much conflicting and confusing information about the link between the food we eat and our health.  This book brings together so many who have come to their conclusions through scientific research as well as personal experience to present a cohesive and compelling collection of evidence that is (almost) impossible to refute.  I’m not suggesting for a moment that scientific research should stop and that we are at some kind of nutritional nirvana but this book proves for once and for all that there is a growing and significant body of evidence of the positive effects of adopting a plant-based diet.

 

I started reading it with a casual attitude and found that I could not put it down as expert after expert laid out their perspective and personal experience before me.  It is written in a most approachable style and language such that you do not need any kind of specialist knowledge to understand what is being said.  In fact it is suitable for anyone.

 

I have one small niggle that the Kindle version does have a somewhat confusing layout, which needs improving and can be a little confusing at first as some paragraphs are broken around others.  I have encountered this in other kindle books so it is not unique to Rethink Food, but if it were addressed it would make it a easier to read and improve the flow.

 

This book is one that I shall buy and give as gifts to anyone who is either interested in or sceptical about the efficacy of plant-based nutrition and how it can help to improve human health, prevent and reverse many chronic diseases faced by society today.

I urge you to read this and to buy it for those you love and care about as this book proves for once and for all that a small change in your diet at any age can have a significantly positive effect on your health and well-being.

 

By the way – and surprise, surprise, you can buy this book in the Plantalicious Shop for the same price as on Amazon.  Click here…http://www.plantalicious.com/shop/

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The A-Z of Plantalicious Ingredients – J Is for Jerusalem Artichoke

Have you seen them?  These nobbly little bundles of delicious nutyness?  Jerusalem Artichokes are only around for a short season in the UK, but if you can get them, buy them.  They are so delicious and worth the effort needed to prepare them.

You may know Jerusalem artichokes by their alternate or US name, Sunchokes. Don’t confuse these with the artichokes that are prevalent in Italian cuisine. Jerusalem artichokes are a root vegetable and look like a cross between a potato and ginger root.

Also, don’t let the misnomer fool you. Jerusalem artichokes aren’t imported from Israel. In fact, they aren’t imported at all. This starchy vegetable is native to the UK as well as North America. Sunchokes have a delicious earthy and nutty flavor similar to jicama (a European root veggie).

So why should Jerusalem artichokes be in your a-z plant vocabulary? It’s a great way to get the carbs that you need without the fat and cholesterol. And the starch isn’t the only carb in Jerusalem artichokes. There is plenty of dietary fiber too.

Here are some more nutritional benefits of Jerusalem artichokes:

  • This root veggie fights constipation by helping the gut to hang onto moisture. Staying regular cleans toxins from the gut area and may help to prevent certain types of cancer.
  • Anti-oxidant vitamins abound in Jerusalem artichokes. Vitamins A, C, and E are all antioxidants making this a cancer fighting vegetable. Antioxidants also help reduce inflammation and can reduce the length of time that the common cold lasts.
  • Potassium is a vital mineral for helping the body not to dehydrate as well as for maintaining good heart health. Jerusalem artichokes get you 9% of the potassium that you need in a day with every 100 gram serving.
  • Iron is a mineral that is vital to the circulatory system. It helps in the production of red blood cells and guards against anemia which can cause fatigue and muscle weakness. A serving of sunchokes gets more than 2/5 of what you need in a day. No other tuber or root can match up to that.
  • Other vitamins and minerals in this vegetable include vitamin B, electrolytes, and copper.
  • They can also help you to boost the protein in your diet with 3 grams of protein per serving.
  • Prebiotics help to feed your body’s natural probiotics and keep them healthy. Sunchokes are filled with inulin, a prebiotic which may help your body’s probiotics to thrive, thus benefiting digestion. Don’t confuse inulin for insulin. Jerusalem artichokes do not reduce blood sugar. They may not raise it as much as other carbs, however, because inulin doesn’t metabolize like other carbohydrates. It’s actually an effective sweetener (saccharin) for diabetics.

So now you know how good they are for you, what do you want to do with them?

The first thing is to wash them, just ensure that you get rid of all the dirt.  There is no need to peel them – Life is too short!

Always cook them in acidulated water (just add a few drops of lemon juice) as otherwise they will discolour.

You can use them to make a really silky and delicious nutty soup – it’s the sort of thing that is so good, you could serve it to guests.

You can also just steam them, mash/purée them or roast them.

Let me know if you find them and how you cook them.

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EatMorePlants – “I can’t! It’s Too hard” – 66% is better than nothing – The 2/3rd-1/3rd Plan

The hashtag that I use on Twitter is #EatMorePlants.

 

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A lot of people say that going plant-based or vegan for health reasons is a big leap.

 

 

Really?  A big leap?

  • What a bigger leap than taking medications like statins daily for the rest of your life?
  • A big leap compared to a lifetime of diabetes?
  • A big leap compared to cancer treatments that ravage the body?

 

I believe that food is our medicine and that we can radically improve our health. I know this not because my yoga teacher told me or from advice from someone down the pub. I know this for myself. I have seen and felt the changes in my body.

 

I’m still a “work in progress” but I know from my shrinking waistline, my increased energy and my remarkable change in my performance at the gym.

 

But, is it a case of “all or nothing”?  For me, it was a conscious choice to change my diet to eating a 95-98% plant-based diet in order to redress much of the harm that years of both overeating and poor food choices had caused.

 

For each of us, what we eat and how we fuel our bodies is a personal choice.  I do not for one moment presume to tell anyone what they should or should not eat.  What I do is to share my experience and knowledge and leave people to make up their own choice.  I am often asked for advice.  The best advice that I can give is to find something that works for you and that you feel comfortable with.  I am happy to help and support anyone regardless of their diet or beliefs around food.

 

Eating more plants for me is something that I believe in, based on what I have learned.  There is a strong body of evidence that eating a no added fat, whole-food, plant-based diet can not only prevent but reverse a number of chronic diseases.  I would rather choose to do this then take pills for the rest of my life.  I’m not perfect in my food choices, I love the occasional cake or plate of chips, but I am doing the best I can.  I’m sure that if I were more diligent about my food choices especially when eating away from home that I would weigh less than I do now.  It is my choice to eat as I do, knowing that for every choice I make there is a repercussion.  The food I consume either contributes to improving my health and well-being or not.

 

So what are you prepared to do for the sake of your own health?

 

I am not suggesting that you go plant-based overnight, but that you consider a few changes that you could make in order to “test the waters”.  I’ve found that when I consistently eat what I consider to be “clean” food that I feel better, brighter, happier, my skin glows and I have lots of energy.  It is not “rocket science” or even “rocket salad” its basic chemistry, our body is a sophisticated machine and reacts and performs based on what we choose to fuel it with.  Think of fueling your car with waste oil, what’s the likely result?

 

So how about trying to see what challenges you could make to improve your health and well-being?

 

Here’s an idea that I came up with the other day – The 2/3rd-1/3rd plan.  

 

The 2/3rd-1/3rd plan is an easy way to achieve change in your diet.

 

Monday to Friday you eat a 2/3rd’s plant-based diet where you have a plant-based breakfast, such as a smoothie or fruit, or oats etc., a huge veggie salad for lunch (or dinner) and your regular dinner (or lunch) and do that for 5 days a week?

 

At weekends you eat a 1/3rd plant-based diet where only 1 meal per day is plant-based – most people find the easiest one to be breakfast, but switch it around to suit you.

 

Over the course of 4 weeks you will have eaten a plant-based diet for almost 16 days out of 28 in total!  It’s that easy.

 

There are lots of materials on the site to support you, such as the recipes, the free Plantalicious 3 Day Challenge e-book, which you can download  here – http://www.plantalicious.com/buy-the-plantalicious-ebook/ or browse the shop for other supporting materials http://www.plantalicious.com/shop/

 

Please let me know how you are getting on and share your experience with me and with others.

 

And remember – #EatMorePlants!!!

 

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The A-Z of Plantalicious Ingredients – H is for Hamburg Parsley

Hamburg Root Parsley is somewhat of a unique ‘off-beat vegetable’. Although this wonderful white and green vegetable is not as common as other root veggies, parsley root is extremely delicious and deserves much more recognition than it gets

Very easy to grow, both the leaves and root are edible. Parsley Root Hamburg has edible large flat, parsley-like leaves but should not be confused with common curly parsley or Italian flat leaf parsley, as neither produce edible roots.

Parsley root is most commonly eaten cooked, as a delectable addition to stews or soups, or simply as chopped or cubed as a steamed side veggie, as you would other roots such as turnips, parsnips, and carrots. In fact, it’s an extremely versatile and exciting vegetable which can be sautéed, roasted, fried, or boiled for a distinctive and savoury accompaniment for any meal.

This charming vegetable is not only a delicious ingredient, it also come with a wonderful array or health benefits.

Parsley is a very rich source of vitamin K, vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin C, iron and folate. Apart from these, it contains a fair amount of other vitamins and minerals and is also very low in calories.

Parsley tea is a tasty tea with an acquired taste that is used as a remedy for various health problems. The herb was used in ancient Greek medicine and in Ayurveda, to treat flatulence, and dyspepsia.

 

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F is for FIBRE – Are you getting enough? Are you “going” enough???

150808-20140203Do you remember the F Plan Diet? I do. The book by British author Audrey Eyton became a huge best seller. Basically the diet suggested restricting calories whilst eating large amounts of fibre. It was also known by another “F” due to the Flatulence it caused! 

It’s almost 35 years since the F Plan hit the shelves and fibre is no longer the hot topic, it once was. Until a recent study that found that heart attack survivors were more likely to be alive. 9 years later if they had a high fibre intake. 
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The Harvard School of Public Health team analysed data from two large US studies involving more than 4,000 men and women who had survived a first heart attack and had provided information about their usual diet via questionnaires.

Interesting, huh? 

That got me thinking about how much dietary fibre most people eat. With my wholefood, plant-based diet I routinely consume more than the experts from US recommendation of 38g. In the UK the average consumption is 14g against a suggested intake of 18g. 

Fibre really does keep everything “moving” through your system. Fibre comes in two types – soluble and insoluble. Soluble slows the digestion and cause gasses. Insoluble fibre is what promotes “stool regularity”. Ok – sorry to talk about poo, but come on, be honest, do you go with ease and as regularly as you’d like? 

Fibre also makes you feel full. 

Should you worry about your fibre intake? Judging by what I see in some shopping baskets, possibly. If you eat a predominately plant based diet, you should have no need to be concerned about your fibre intake. 
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If you are eating whole grains, peas, beans, legumes plus plenty of vegetables and fruit, you should have no worries about your fibre intake. 

How can you tell if you are getting enough? For me, it’s the regularity with which I go. 

What’s your fibre intake like? 
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