Posts

Have you visited the Plantalicious Shop? It is open all hours! Come on in and take a look…

Do you love shopping?

I do!  I’m always up for a bit of retail therapy.

One of the things when I first started eating Plantalicious was that I did not have a lot of resources.  Recipes, books that explained the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle etc., Over the weeks, and months I have discovered lots of great resources: DVD’s, books, cookery books as well as ingredients and equipment.  Very often friends and followers would ask me for advice on this and that or what book to buy as a gift, or what blender I use.

So…I created the Plantalicious Shop – It contains many of the books and resources that I have used as well as links to more unusual ingredients that you may not be able to get on your high street.  My shop only stocks and sells things that I have either used and want to share with you or things that I recommend.  In fact, I think I own all of the items listed.  I also provide some information too to help you in your choices and to explain why I use the item.  The shop sells the items via an “Amazon Affiliate” relationship so your items are sent from Amazon and I get a small percentage which goes towards running Plantalicious and you pay the same as if you had bought the items on Amazon directly. The transaction is safe and secure just as any Amazon purchase.

A few items that I would like to highlight are:

  • ReThink Food – I recently did a review of this wonderful book that empowers you to take control of your health destiny- see here
  • The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook – The Esselstyn’s are an amazing family.  Following on from the work of Dr Esselstyn his wife Ann Crile Esselstyn and daughter Jane have recently published this book.  The book answers the question of “how do i…Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease?” – the answer is simple, you cook and eat these Plantalicious recipes.
  • The Happy Pear Cookbook – The Flynn brothers cookbook from their wonderful shop and restaurant in Greystones in Ireland.  Not all the recipes are Plantalicious but their food is so good and they just make vegetables and fruit sing.  They also run a brilliant course – The Happy Heart to reduce cholesterol.  Buy the book and take the first step towards managing your health, reducing your cholesterol and enjoy delicious food at the same time.
  • If I had a £ for every time I am asked about blenders, I would be a wealthy man – This is the mother of all blenders – it is not cheap, but it is the best investment you will every make for your kitchen and your health – Its a Vitamix
  • Finally, the book that started me on this amazing journey to health – The China Study, by T. Colin Campbell – If you have not read it – now is the time.  It will change your life, as it did mine.

So next time you need some Plantalicious support or inspiration or are in the market for a blender, head over to the Plantalicious shop and bag yourself a bargain that is not only good for your wallet but also for your health.

Share Button

What fruit or vegetable do you dislike?

Is there a fruit or vegetable that you dislike?

What is it about that particular fruit or vegetable that you dislike?

Do you only like some things cooked or raw?

As a child I had a hatred of a number of foods, these included peas – I hated the texture; broad beans – the smell put me off; Brussels Sprouts – I would sit for hours doing battle with my parents finally agreeing to eat two before I could leave the table!

Nowadays there are few things that I do not like.  One of these is the humble Pear.

004

Guess what?  Pears are in season just now and having not checked what was in my organic box this week, I got not one but four lots of pears.  Enough for a family of 6 or a small office.  The problem is that our family is just me and Mr G and i’m not lugging pears into my office in town.

The other thing that I get from my childhood is the belief that food should not be wasted.  Many of the meals that I ate as a child were made from leftovers.  The Sunday roast would provide a meal for the family as a roast, then maybe a casserole and maybe a soup or cold cuts.  Vegetables were turned into pies, or bubble and squeak.   So I was not prepared to waste them.  Mr G only likes pears when they are rock hard and these were ripe when delivered.  Hmmm.  What to do?

I came up with two recipes that worked for me.  I like pears in salads, so I made a salad –Pear & Pecan Salad Recipe I also love crumbles and anything ginger so I made a Pear and Ginger Crumble – Pear and Ginger Crumble Recipe

I have to say that based on that experience, I am not dreading more pears but actually quite looking forward to making another crumble or salad!

So, despite my strong dislike of pears, I managed to make two Plantalicious dishes both of which I liked and judging by the empty dishes, so did Mr G.

What vegetables and fruits do you dislike?  Leave me a message on here or on the community pages of the things that you dislike and why and if you want me to see if I can conjure up a recipe that you would like so you can rediscover your nemesis, just as I did.

 

Share Button

Book Review – Rethink Food, by Shushana Castle and Amy-Lee Goodman

So many people trivialise diet and the link between what we eat and our health.  Friends, colleagues, personal trainers, that chap down the pub even Dr’s and specialists deny that there is a link between our well-being and what we stuff down our throats every day to feed ourselves.

 

Well, now there is a book that helps you fight back with the assistance of over 100 Doctors – real qualified Dr’s not quacks or people with an axe to grind, plus a bunch of elite althletes and 8 world renowned nutritionists. This small global army provide evidence based arguements for how a plant-based diet can not only prevent but reverse a range of chronic diseases.

 

The book uses a format whereby each one of contributors provides an article or small chapter on their personal perspective.  Some reviewers do not like this format as it does lead to some repetition, but in my opinion, they are missing the point as the repetition is there to drive home the message of the book that a plant-based way of eating not only deals with the symptoms of many chronic diseases but actually the causes.  This is something that traditional medicine fails to do every day for many millions of people while the pharmaceutical industry’s profits grow in proportion to the obesity epidemic that we are seeing in so many developed countries around the world.

 

The material in this book debunks many of the myths around nutrition and health as well as the down right lies and falsehoods that have been propagated by the meat and dairy industry over the years.  Think about – “Milk for strong bones” or should that be “Milk for osteoporosis”; “Meat the ultimate and only protein source” or should that be “we need much less protein and can get all we need from a plant-based diet”.

 

Critics will say that the book does not provide any counter arguements to it’s viewpoint.  Again, I think that is the point of this book.  There is so much conflicting and confusing information about the link between the food we eat and our health.  This book brings together so many who have come to their conclusions through scientific research as well as personal experience to present a cohesive and compelling collection of evidence that is (almost) impossible to refute.  I’m not suggesting for a moment that scientific research should stop and that we are at some kind of nutritional nirvana but this book proves for once and for all that there is a growing and significant body of evidence of the positive effects of adopting a plant-based diet.

 

I started reading it with a casual attitude and found that I could not put it down as expert after expert laid out their perspective and personal experience before me.  It is written in a most approachable style and language such that you do not need any kind of specialist knowledge to understand what is being said.  In fact it is suitable for anyone.

 

I have one small niggle that the Kindle version does have a somewhat confusing layout, which needs improving and can be a little confusing at first as some paragraphs are broken around others.  I have encountered this in other kindle books so it is not unique to Rethink Food, but if it were addressed it would make it a easier to read and improve the flow.

 

This book is one that I shall buy and give as gifts to anyone who is either interested in or sceptical about the efficacy of plant-based nutrition and how it can help to improve human health, prevent and reverse many chronic diseases faced by society today.

I urge you to read this and to buy it for those you love and care about as this book proves for once and for all that a small change in your diet at any age can have a significantly positive effect on your health and well-being.

 

By the way – and surprise, surprise, you can buy this book in the Plantalicious Shop for the same price as on Amazon.  Click here…http://www.plantalicious.com/shop/

Share Button

Get the Plantalicious 3 Day Challenge e-Book for free (save £6.99)

If you have not heard already, I have produced an e-book that is a handy guide as a starter for those new to, or curious about a plant-based diet.  Maybe you just want to reduce your meat intake by one or two meals a week, or you just do not know what to buy to get started.  Well now you do.  Download a copy of my e-book!

 

You can also refer friends to the download site if they are interested to know more about a plant-based diet.  The book contains recipes for 3 days including breakfasts, lunches and dinners as well as snacks and some basics.  It also has a shopping list so you know what to stock up with to make the recipes.

 

To download the e-book just visit this page of my site – http://www.plantalicious.com/buy-the-plantalicious-ebook/   to save yourself the cost of £6.99, simply sign up for the Plantalicious Newsletter and “hey presto” you will then be able to download the e-book for free.  How about that for plant-based magic?

 

If you are already a news letter subscriber, please just email me – Barry@Plantalicious.com and I will send you the e-book by email.

 

Please let me have any comments and feedback on the book.  What you liked, what could be improved and what you’d like to see more of.  You can comment here on www.plantalicious.com of ping me an email.  I’d also love to hear how people get on with the 3 day Plantalicious Challenge – how did you feel?  How did you find the recipes?  Did you miss anything?

Share Button
2107-20140521

The A-Z of Plantalicious Ingredients – H is for Hamburg Parsley

Hamburg Root Parsley is somewhat of a unique ‘off-beat vegetable’. Although this wonderful white and green vegetable is not as common as other root veggies, parsley root is extremely delicious and deserves much more recognition than it gets

Very easy to grow, both the leaves and root are edible. Parsley Root Hamburg has edible large flat, parsley-like leaves but should not be confused with common curly parsley or Italian flat leaf parsley, as neither produce edible roots.

Parsley root is most commonly eaten cooked, as a delectable addition to stews or soups, or simply as chopped or cubed as a steamed side veggie, as you would other roots such as turnips, parsnips, and carrots. In fact, it’s an extremely versatile and exciting vegetable which can be sautéed, roasted, fried, or boiled for a distinctive and savoury accompaniment for any meal.

This charming vegetable is not only a delicious ingredient, it also come with a wonderful array or health benefits.

Parsley is a very rich source of vitamin K, vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin C, iron and folate. Apart from these, it contains a fair amount of other vitamins and minerals and is also very low in calories.

Parsley tea is a tasty tea with an acquired taste that is used as a remedy for various health problems. The herb was used in ancient Greek medicine and in Ayurveda, to treat flatulence, and dyspepsia.

 

Share Button

F is for FIBRE – Are you getting enough? Are you “going” enough???

150808-20140203Do you remember the F Plan Diet? I do. The book by British author Audrey Eyton became a huge best seller. Basically the diet suggested restricting calories whilst eating large amounts of fibre. It was also known by another “F” due to the Flatulence it caused! 

It’s almost 35 years since the F Plan hit the shelves and fibre is no longer the hot topic, it once was. Until a recent study that found that heart attack survivors were more likely to be alive. 9 years later if they had a high fibre intake. 
129879-20131210

The Harvard School of Public Health team analysed data from two large US studies involving more than 4,000 men and women who had survived a first heart attack and had provided information about their usual diet via questionnaires.

Interesting, huh? 

That got me thinking about how much dietary fibre most people eat. With my wholefood, plant-based diet I routinely consume more than the experts from US recommendation of 38g. In the UK the average consumption is 14g against a suggested intake of 18g. 

Fibre really does keep everything “moving” through your system. Fibre comes in two types – soluble and insoluble. Soluble slows the digestion and cause gasses. Insoluble fibre is what promotes “stool regularity”. Ok – sorry to talk about poo, but come on, be honest, do you go with ease and as regularly as you’d like? 

Fibre also makes you feel full. 

Should you worry about your fibre intake? Judging by what I see in some shopping baskets, possibly. If you eat a predominately plant based diet, you should have no need to be concerned about your fibre intake. 
ID-10080634

If you are eating whole grains, peas, beans, legumes plus plenty of vegetables and fruit, you should have no worries about your fibre intake. 

How can you tell if you are getting enough? For me, it’s the regularity with which I go. 

What’s your fibre intake like? 
Share Button

There are no “Silver Bullets” – It’s progress not perfection and dealing with the frustrations.

Here is a video blog entry about my experience and recent “low point” after 12 months of following a plant-based diet.

 

 

Please share your experiences by adding some comments or by joining the community.

Share Button
249303-20140412

The A-Z of Plantalicious Ingredients – G is for Garlic

 

As a child, I could eat onions of any kind.  At family events, I’d be the child eating the very hot crunchy pickled onions.  My father would steep raw onions in vinegar for us to have with salads on Sunday evenings.  I loved them.  In terms of garlic, I’d not tasted fresh garlic at home.  My Mum had a small plastic garlic clove with garlic salt in it.  I can remember being invited to dinner with my newly married brother and my sister-in-law where I tasted “real” garlic for the fist time at the age of 12.  OMG – I loved it, it was onion but to the max!

 

As I grew up I started to understand why it should be a staple part of my cooking.  Mainly used as a flavour enhancer, garlic also has other uses as well.

 

Not that many people know that garlic is actually native to the Central Asia, and it has been used quite a lot by the ancient Egyptians as well, for both culinary and medicinal purposes. Nowadays, we have 7 different types of garlic in Europe, and those are the Ajo Morado de las Pedroñeras, Aglio Rosso di Nubia , Ail rose de Lautre, Ail de la Drôme, Aglio Bianco Polesano, Aglio di Voghiera and Ail blanc de Lomagne.

 47808-20140412

Garlic can be cultivated all the year in mild climates all over the world, and this is especially true across Europe. Although garlic is not typically consumed in large amounts, it can provide your body  with lots of nutrients.

 

Garlic is a triple-whammy: it’s antibacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal. Garlic is one food that we all should be eating every day.

Researchers have found that allicin, a chemical found in garlic that gives it its flavour, could be used to fight cancer. It appears that the natural chemical reaction that forms allicin, which occurs when the garlic is eaten or smashed, may penetrate and kill tumour cells.

Several studies suggest that garlic has many beneficial effects on the heart. Garlic may:

  • Lower total cholesterol
  • Lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Help keep blood thin, reducing the risk of blood clots and stroke
  • Lower elevated serum levels of homocysteine, according to preliminary studies

Garlic also works like an antibiotic against bacteria, virus, and protozoa in the body, and unlike with antibiotics, no resistance can be built up so it is an absolutely safe product to use.

Garlic can have a powerful antioxidant effect in the body, which means it helps to protect against damaging free radicals.

Garlic’s anti-fungal properties are excellent for reducing fungal infections, such as yeast infections.

People claim that people who eat garlic tend to get fewer bites from insects like ticks, according to research. It also likely applies to mosquitoes as well.  I’m not sure about that as I still seem to be seen as a healthy snack to any passing mosquito.

One problem with garlic, of course, is the smell, but if you have a good digestion that should not be a problem.  You can also chew a little parsley to reduce the smell.  Garlic is a herb, so if you do not like it or it makes you feel sick, this is your body’s way of telling you that you should avoid it.

Garlic will also improve your iron metabolism, thanks to the diallyl sulfides which help in the production of the ferroportin protein. It’s also a good source of selenium, because it gathers selenium from the soil while growing.

The largest garlic benefits are surely coming in the form of blood cell and blood vessel protection from various types of stress. What’s more, it also prevents the formation of clots inside blood vessels, something that is nothing short of amazing.

Alongside these wonderful benefits, garlic also includes numerous vitamins such as C or B6. It also helps your body integrate them quickly in the blood stream, making it more powerful and resistant to diseases as well.

The garlic we use every day in our meals doesn’t include that much carbohydrates. Instead, it’s full of inulin, a fiber that keeps the bacteria population in your intestines balanced, while also allowing your body to absorb more calcium.

  • Garlic is low in fat, and it has no cholesterol
  • It contains various elements that help your body absorb calcium, while also increasing your overall immunity
  • It’s rich in vitamins and minerals
  • It’s one of the few ingredients of a meal that give a wonderful flavour, and it also has a great effect on your overall health as well!

How much garlic do you eat?  What is your favourite way of eating it?

Quick tip – Peel a lot of garlic and freeze the cloves, you can purée them and add salt and oil (if you use it) or brine.

Share Button
178099-20140303

Plant-based eating – Does it improve athletic performance?

Ok. So I am a sample of 1, but if my experiences are anything to go by, the answer is yes.

Yes – My athletic performance and recovery are both massively improved on a plant- based diet.

Ok – So I am not known for my athletic prowess, BUT….I have found that I do not ache after Personal Training Sessions.  My muscles recover quickly so I can train the next day.  Not bad for a (still) flabby 50 something.  My performance at my training sessions is stellar compared to what it was years ago.  Today i did 3 sets of 32kg bicep curls, I’d never have done that years ago.  I can work out so much better that before, training for longer and lifting heavier weights.

So, a sample of 1 – and not the most shining example of health and fitness yet, as I am still on my journey to improve my health.  So I asked others.  Here are a sample of what I had back as replies:

  • “Personally, I recover much faster. Most of our community will tell you the same. Plants are nurturing foods. :)” @VegRunChat
  • “for me that was the first benefit I noticed after becoming plant based, first of many” and “not a scientist but I think that a lot of plants are anti inflammatory as well as vitamin e aids in muscle recovery” @Bry_nFlynn 
  • “I find I recover faster which allows me to go longer & faster.. & lift heavier!” and “digesting massive amounts of animal protein takes days while the body quickly breaks down plants & absorbs their nutrients” @MeaganDunnCole

So then I started digging and found lots and lots of articles on how plant-based eating improves athletic performance.  One of the best, I have re-produced below.

This was written by @VegRunChat and the original article can be found here: http://vegrunchat.com/blog/5-benefits-of-running-plant-based/

Its a great site with lots of great info – check it out – http://vegrunchat.com/ but not before you read the article….

I went meat free about 3 weeks ago. I already notice that I have more energy, stamina, and I recover faster.” @Futurisa

I can run longer and faster with less fatigue since switching to a plant based diet.” @IRanWithRobert

These are a just a couple of the tweets making their way onto Twitter from plant-based runners who claim that a meat-free diet has remarkably improved their athletic performance.  It’s no surprise that, with books like Eat & Run, Finding Ultra, and the newly released No Meat Athleterunners have jumped on board a plant-based diet.  But what are the real benefits?  Is it all a bunch of hype?  Here are five ways that a plant-based diet can help boost your running career:

Less weight to carry – Eating a diet that excludes meat, eggs, cheese, and dairy will not only shed pounds, but keep the weight off.  Add running to the equation and you’ll have a body that’s perfectly sculpted, ready for any athletic challenge.  Many vegan runners (including Scott Jurek) claim that a plant-based diet has allowed them to become faster and use far less energy due to their decreased weight.  This is especially beneficial to those who run marathon (or greater) distances, as they can make better use of their energy stores.

Perfect Proteins – A plant-based diet provides runners with all of the nutrients that the body requires. Yes, even protein.  In fact, plants contain some of the most complete proteins around.  A complete protein contains each of the nine essential amino acids which we cannot live without (Histidine, Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Threonine, Tryptophan, and Valine).  Take hemp hearts and flax seeds for example; they contain all of the essential amino acid chains and contain 20 and 31 grams of protein per serving, respectively.  Furthermore, plant-based foods don’t contain artery-clogging saturated fats or cholesterol like animal-based sources of protein.

Increased bone density – Although the meat and dairy industry would love for us to believe that the secret to strong bones is milk, this couldn’t be further from the truth.  Yes, milk contains up to 300mg of calcium per cup.  But what the nutrition label doesn’t tell you is that our bodies hardly absorb this calcium, or make good use of it.  Milk (like all animal proteins) acidifies our bodies PH level which triggers a natural counter-reaction.  In an attempt to correct matters, our bodies pull calcium (which is a natural acid neutralizing element) from our bones.  The excreted calcium then leaves the body through urine, leaving us with a calcium deficiency.  On the other hand, plant foods with high levels of calcium (collards, kale and sweet potatoes) will boost bone health without affecting the body’s PH.

Energy Surge – Many runners claim that after switching to a vegan or vegetarian diet, their energy levels are restored to a level they haven’t experienced since childhood.  But why is this?  Simply put, plant-based foods contain all of the essential vitamins and nutrients we need to perform at our best.  Moreover, plant-based eaters appear to be more consciousness about other ingredients in their food.  Animal-free eaters typically omit foods that contain preservatives, additives, sweeteners, and other artificial ingredients.  Removing these ingredients from your diet enables your body to make the best use of your food.  Without these foreign ingredients, your body can process and digest foods easier, allowing for more energy to be used for better things – like running!

Faster Recovery – Plants are often referred to as nourishing foods.  This is because they do just that; nourish our bodies, replenishing lost vitamins and nutrients.  Most running pains which occur in the hips and joints are due to inflammation – the body’s normal protective response to an injury or infection.  But many plant foods contain anti-inflammatory properties that alleviate this pain and reduce inflammation.  So put that Aleve and Tylenol aside.  Use walnuts, garlic, turmeric, or fresh olives the next time you experience joint discomfort.  You will be back to running before you know it!

Are you still concerned about making the switch to a plant-based diet?  Worried it could impede your running?  You don’t have to make a full commitment to eating plants and go all-in at first.  Start out by making a few changes, and see how you feel.  You may be surprised to find that removing just meat and milk from your meals will promote faster recover and energy.  If you would like more information, I invite you to join us for#VegRunChat on Twitter Sunday nights at 9pm EST.  During the hour-long chat we discuss plant-based foods and how they relate to running performance.  You will find that it is extremely educational and fun.  We even give away prizes!

Have you ever considered going plant-based or vegetarian?  What has kept you from giving it a try?

Share Button
bhoneycombe1

The A-Z of Plantalicious Ingredients – F is for Fennel

I loved aniseed balls as a kid.  I used to go up to the shop at the far end of Mayes Lane buy a “quater” or 4 oz of them and devour them within minutes.   I could not get enough of that exotic aniseed flavour.  At college I drank Pernod, thinking myself rather sophisticated, (hardly) and have also sampled Raki, Arak and Ouzo on my travels.  I ended up with a pair of emerald earrings in Beirut after drinking Arak, but that’s a tale for another time!  Aniseed is a  flavour that I have always loved, hence my love of fennel as a vegetable.

Fennel (also known as Florence fennel or finocchio) is a delightfully crunchy and slightly sweet herb that has a bulb-like shape, making it look a little like a heavy-bottomed celery.

 

bhoneycombefennel

It has not yet been spread and naturalized as an herb around the world, but still primarily grows in coastal climates and on riverbanks.

While this fantastically flavourful herb is most commonly associated with Italian cooking, it is actually an extremely versatile ingredient. In fact the bulb, stalk, leaves and seeds are all edible and delicious.

Any part can be chopped raw and added into your favourite salads. When eaten raw like this, the texture is crisp and the flavour is quite assertive and aniseed-like.  The leaves are delicately flavoured and similar in shape to those of dill. It truly is a delicious way to enhance the texture and flavour of a salad or coleslaw.

Cooked, it becomes much softer and has a more mellow flavour. The bulb makes an excellent addition to any mediterranean dishes. It’s also wonderful sautéed, stewed, braised or grilled. The leaves can also be used to liven up soups and sauces, or as a garnish.

Dried, fennel also makes for a sweet, calming tea, although that’s the one time, I am not keen on it.

Ideally choose the smaller, young bulbs, as they are more tender. They should look white, with no blemishes, and feel heavy for their size. The feathery green tops should be fresh and bright, with no yellowing.

Quick recipe tip – Pop some chopped fennel into an oven-proof dish, with some stock, cover and bake for 45 mins.  Simple and delicious.

As well as being a pungent delight for the taste buds and tasty addition to any meal, Fennel has a number of amazing health benefits, including anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties.

The same high concentration of essential oils in fennel that gives it the aromatic fragrance and flavour, makes it an effective potential cure for many mild to moderate ailments.

  •  Since fennel is rich in iron and histidine, it serves as a good natural remedy for anemia
  • Lactating mothers can consume fennel juice regularly to increase the secretion of nutritious milk for their infants
  • The high amounts of vitamin C, flavonoids and essential oils in fennel bulb all provide synergistic healing properties for the prevention of cancer*
  • The essential oils in fennel increases the secretion of digestive juices, helping in reduction of stomach inflammation and in the absorption of nutrients from the food eaten
  • The sulphur content together with all the right amino acids and essential oils in fennel help strengthen hair
  • The high potassium content in fennel helps reduce high blood pressure and thus decreasing the risk for heart attack and stroke

*with regard to the potential benefits that Fennel has regarding cancer and weight-loss, see this article I just came across – http://www.naturalnews.com/044051_fennel_cancer_treatment_weight_loss.html

 

Share Button